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March 17th 2020 – COVID-19 Update

We met with the contractors today and expressed concerns about what is happening, or may potentially happen, on job sites. We didn’t get many answers. There are still many unknowns. We are trying to find out all we can. It is in everyone’s interest to keep every worker safe.

This afternoon, the International Office came out with the NECA/IBEW National Disease Emergency Response Agreement. Please read it. http://www.ibew.org/media-center/Articles/20Daily/2003/200317_IBEW_NECA_Sign

Office Closed Temporarily

In line with guidance handed down from the IBEW Sixth District, in order to keep our members healthy and try to contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus, the Local 159 business office will be temporarily closed to all external traffic.

We will continue to staff the office and serve members through telephone and electronic communication, but we will not meet with members or the public who visit the Local 159 office.

We will follow this protocol through March 29. We will follow Sixth District and IO guidance, and continue to reassess the situation. We will continue to do our very best to serve everyone, during this ever-changing situation.

To sign the book, or get referral papers: phone Tom Lemens.… Read more... “Office Closed Temporarily”

INDUSTRY RECOGNIZED APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAMS: BAD FOR THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

The Department of Labor (DOL) has proposed a rule that would allow private entities like employers and trade associations to self-certify apprenticeship programs. These programs would be referred to as Industry Recognized Apprenticeship Programs or IRAPs.

What is an IRAP?

IRAPs are “apprenticeship programs” that are not registered with a state or the DOL. IRAPs would be approved by private industry entities and would not fall under the same requirements as current DOL or state registered apprenticeship programs. IRAPs differ significantly from our Registered Joint Apprenticeship Programs. Our programs help recruit, train and retain workers through progressive wage increases; apprentice-to-journeyman ratios that promote safety; quality assurance assessments by the government; uniform standards; mandatory safety training; instructor eligibility requirements; and transparency requirements.… Read more... “INDUSTRY RECOGNIZED APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAMS: BAD FOR THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY”